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Unit 9 Discussion: Were the Mongols Barbaric? | Assignment Helpers

For a society that is depicted as ruthless and barbaric, the accounts of William of Rubruck illustrate a different picture. From the article, Bak and Rady (2010) portray the Mongols as the most barbaric and fearsome community that ever existed[1]. From the accounts of the article, the Mongols are presented as a community that comprised of warriors that left massive destruction in their wake in the process of conquering different lands. The level of ruthlessness would make someone qualm and fear to a level of pissing on themselves with the thought of encountering the Mongols itself. The Mongols invasion was characterized by swiftness, death, and destruction which cut across the areas they conquered.

Also, the level of animosity of the Mongols was extensive as they did not exclude women or children from their wrath. In the invasion battles and captured captives as part of the spoils of the war did not consider gender or age to caution the level of brutality they exerted[2]. Master Roger’s accounts indicate the profound level of barbarity in which the Mongols advanced especially to their enemies. This place caution and fear of extensive bloodshed and suffering for anyone who stood against the Mongols. The speed in which the conquered different lands left a reputation of fear and animosity in which the soldiers exhibited. Therefore, any potentiality of encountering them was troublesome and call for caution and ability to do everything possible to hide from the Mongols.

William Rubruck offers different accounts of the nature and kind of people the Mongols were which is different from the extensive insights developed over the history[3]. Rubruck’s accounts illustrate the Mongols as a different kind of people that were not as ruthless and formidable as they had been depicted throughout history[4]. For instance, based on the Mongols’ social and religious customs and their celebrations, Rubruck presents them as an orderly community with strong cultural values. Such as, the Mongols respect for the dead was profound that prompted them to come together, share a drink, and sprinkle some of the liquor on the image of the master’s head[5]. The drink was made of the capital drink of rice, millet, and honey. This indicates the context of the Mongols coming together to tend to one of their own and celebrate their life.

The funeral practices and occurrences of someone falling sick was a crucial moment that the Mongols expressed their unique cultural practices. For example, on the death of the rich, little pointed structures were developed. The pyramids comprised of the resting placing which the dead were buried with their treasure[6]. On the occurrence of the sickness, a sign was to be placed on the dwelling place of the affected person and served as a caution for others not to enter. This indicates the accounts to which the Mongols as a community cared for each other. Thus, there was high concern and action from the community members catering for their own.

Furthermore, religion was a crucial component of the Mongolian people. The priests were required to shave their heads and dressed in saffron color and they observed chastity over the period. The priests also were prompted to live in congregations of one or two hundred as they stayed in the temple[7]. The nature of religions and beliefs as a community indicate that the Mongols were a civilized community that respected authority and religious teachings in an orderly manner.

Bibliographies

Bak, Janos, and Rady, Martyn. Escaping the Mongols: A survivor’s account from the 13th century. Mediavalists.net, Central European University Press, 2010. https://www.medievalists.net/2018/01/escaping-mongols-survivors-account-13th-century/

Morgan, David O. “The Mongol Empire: a review article.” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London (1981): 120-125.

William of Rubruck’s account of the Mongols. Silk Road Seattle, 2004. https://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/texts/rubruck.html

[1] Bak, Janos, and Rady, Martyn. Escaping the Mongols: A survivor’s account from the 13th century. Mediavalists.net, Central European University Press, 2010. https://www.medievalists.net/2018/01/escaping-mongols-survivors-account-13th-century/

[2] Ibid.

[3] William of Rubruck’s account of the Mongols. Silk Road Seattle, 2004. https://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/texts/rubruck.html

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Morgan, David O. “The Mongol Empire: a review article.” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London (1981): 120-125.

 

[7] William of Rubruck’s account of the Mongols. Silk Road Seattle, 2004. https://depts.washington.edu/silkroad/texts/rubruck.html

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Unit 9 Discussion: Were the Mongols Barbaric? | Assignment Helpers . (2021, December 29). Essay Writing . Retrieved December 08, 2022, from https://www.essay-writing.com/samples/unit-9-discussion-were-the-mongols-barbaric/
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Unit 9 Discussion: Were the Mongols Barbaric? | Assignment Helpers . [online]. Available at: <https://www.essay-writing.com/samples/unit-9-discussion-were-the-mongols-barbaric/> [Accessed 08 Dec. 2022].
Unit 9 Discussion: Were the Mongols Barbaric? | Assignment Helpers [Internet]. Essay Writing . 2021 Dec 29 [cited 2022 Dec 08]. Available from: https://www.essay-writing.com/samples/unit-9-discussion-were-the-mongols-barbaric/
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